Tomic Arrives

Bernard Tomic loves a big occasion. Despite sitting at #158 before Wimbledon began he’s now reached the fourth round after knocking out world number five Robin Soderling.

Tomic forehand

Soderling may well have been unwell during the match but Tomic must be given credit for handling his win like a top 10 player, brushing the Swede aside in a first set lasting just 17 minutes before seeing it out in straight sets.

BBC commentary constantly referred to Tomic’s view that his ultimate strength is finding his opponent’s weakness. That is a philosophy which will win him many matches in the future and, based solely on his third round victory, a potential major.

What’s surprising is how his record before his visit to south west London this year has been so disappointing compared to his achievements elsewhere.

The 18-year-old qualifier has made the third round of the Australian Open this year and has been to the second round of his home major the two years previous to that.

Ace of Baseline has been following Tomic since the early days of the blog’s creation (he’s the second one along on the top-right banner) and his record on the ATP World Tour has been nothing special.

His two career title successes have come on the ATP Challenger Tour and his last triumph at that level came in February last year whilst his other was 12 months before that with both coming in Australia.

Along with those wins Down Under he took the junior Aussie Open crown in 2008 aged just 15.

Perhaps age is the key. He is only 18, still eligible for the juniors and more ATP World Tour events instead of Challenger tournaments in the future will see his progress quicken.

His coolness on the show court against Soderling and his ability to come back from two sets down versus Igor Andreev in round two are good traits. He has the mentality to succeed and seems to lap up a pressurised situation.

His next match will be against Xavier Malisse and his chances of reaching the last eight are seemingly decent against the 30-year-old Belgian. We’ll learn a lot more from Tomic in that match now he’s set to be watched by more and more eyes.

After progressing further than Aussie legend and their last man to win a Slam Lleyton Hewitt, Tomic will become the new number one player from the country.

He’s actually a German-born Aussie of Croatian and Bosnian descent (if that’s not too hard to grasp) so there will probably be several countries trying to convert the flag next to his name.

History regarding his nationality has landed him in hot water in the past with his dad – who’s also his coach – threatening to force Tomic to play for Croatia, whilst an incident with Hewitt a while ago means he’s by no means a straightforward guy to predict.

Taking in mind his successful record in the southern hemisphere and the support he’ll receive from The Fanatics in the future, if he stays to his Gold Coast roots then Australia’s heir to Hewitt could be just, if not more, of a success.

The Fanatics

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Sabine Returns

Prior to Sabine Lisicki’s incredible victory against French Open champion Li Na, this post was due to be titled “Anyone for bagels?” as the young players struggled to make an impact at Wimbledon this year.

Two 19-year-olds in Melanie Oudin and Kristyna Pliskova were destroyed 6-0 in their opening sets of the first round before going out to Ana Ivanovic and Marion Bartoli respectively.

Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, another 19-year-old, made it to the second round but after reaching the quarter-finals at Roland Garros and being 14th seed it was a surprise to see her lose in straight sets to Nadia Petrova.

Sticking with the pre-20 age group Simona Halep almost produced a stunning result against one of the title favourites Serena Williams.

The Romanian, who beat Bojana Jovanovski in round one, took the first set versus Williams before the American turned up the heat and showed why she’s won at The All England Club for the past two years. Halep eventually lost 3-6, 6-2, 6-1 and saved suffering a bagel in the last set.

Second round casualties also came for Rebecca Marino, Polona Hercog and Christina McHale with the latter producing a great first round result beating 28th seed Ekaterina Makarova 8-6 in the third set.

Speaking of 8-6 in the third set, Sabine Lisicki is now firmly back amongst top level tennis again. You may have heard her story several times over the last few hours but it’s worth repeating.

Ranked outside the top 200 this year having been out for seven months with a severe ankle injury, the current world number 62 and Aegon Classic champion saved two match points to reach the third round of Wimbledon over Chinese sensation Li Na.

The tennis was outstanding, the drama even better and now her chances of equalling the quarter-final run she had in 2009 is seemingly possible.

Her next opponent is another Asian player but with very much less experience. Japan’s Misaki Doi is 19-years-old and ranked outside the top 100 but has come through qualifying and Bethanie Mattek-Sands’ tennis ball sleeves along the way to the third round.

Another good match-up is Maria Sharapova vs. Laura Robson. If Robson wants to announce herself on the WTA Tour then she’ll have no better chance to do so against the woman who won at SW19 as a 17-year-old.

Robson is at that age now and although her chances of emulating her junior win on centre court in the seniors, a victory over the fifth seed would top anything she’s done in her career up to this point.

For her compatriot Heather Watson, it was a disappointing end to a steady-looking win as an elbow injury ultimately left her serving redundant and an often wild Mathilde Johansson took the match 2-6 6-4 6-4.

The men didn’t have much luck either although there were some promising signs which still need to be decided tomorrow.

Grigor Dimitrov has been likened to Roger Federer and you can see why. He possesses such talent and looks like a Grand Slam winner of the future.

This year Jo-Wilfried Tsonga proved to much of a task to overcome after several rain delays but the recently turned 20-year-old fought all the way to the end, producing wonderful tennis along the way.

On the other courts Bernard Tomic and Ryan Harrison were busy announcing why they’ve been hyped along with Dimitrov.

Tomic continues tomorrow against Igor Andreev after winning the third set to make it 2-1 and David Ferrer will try to come back from 2-1 down against Harrison.

Elsewhere the dream third round tie between Milos Raonic and Rafael Nadal didn’t materialise after the Canadian had to retire in the previous round whilst Kei Nishikori battled but couldn’t prevent Lleyton Hewitt rolling back the years and taking a first round win. Alexandr Dolgopolov also lost to Fernando Gonzalez in the opening round.

Wimbledon 2011

A little thing called Wimbledon returns tomorrow and it never fails to deliver shocks, surprises, high-quality and new names.

Take, for example, last year. Petra Kvitova reached the semi-finals as an unseeded player and is now ranked in the top 10.

In my mind, she’s a Grand Slam winner in the making. Three WTA titles have come since then and with the Williams sisters rusty after only just coming back from injury, Kim Clijsters out and the courts on grass again, the 21-year-old could easily match her performance or even go beyond it.

Perhaps the biggest surprise 12 months ago belonged to Tsvetana Pironkova whom I’d followed every year at SW19 where she’d lose in the first or second round but mostly the first. Remarkably she then made the semi-finals.

Her record of zero WTA titles and only ever reaching the second round of the other majors indicates the 23-year-old’s unbelievable run was indeed a fluke and should those first round exits return then the 32nd seed will dramatically fall out of the top 100.

She can, though, savour and draw inspiration from beating Venus Williams (again) and should they meet this year, it will be very interesting.

Vera Zvonareva provided a different form of shock last year as her career renaissance started. Aged 25 and seeded 21st, not many expected her to reach the final but since then she’s come close to winning the US Open and has been in the top 5 of the rankings ever since.

It’s not just restricted to the women either. Tomas Berdych reaching the final, beating Roger Federer along the way, will go down as a monumental upset and despite all the hype of a “Fedal” final, the last two have been contested with Andy Roddick and Berdych.

Wimbledon Court One Panorama

The young players looking to make a name for themselves this year include a wealth of British talent. Laura Robson, who split from her coach just days ago, and Heather Watson have been given wildcards along with German Sabine Lisicki, a former quarter-finalist who’s back for the first time since that 2009 last eight appearance.

Kristyna Pliskova, junior Wimbledon winner in 2010, has made it through to the first round having qualified and will not have it easy against Marion Bartoli who was another shock face in the 2007 women’s final after conquering Justine Henin from a set and a break down in the semis.

In men’s qualifying Bernard Tomic is finally regaining the sort of form which saw him reach the third round of his home tournament, the Australian Open.

Despite being outside the top 150, he reached the first round in the French Open and has followed that up with a second first round appearance at Wimbledon.

There was also good news for American Ryan Harrison who qualified as a lucky loser. Tomic plays Nikolay Davydenko, Harrison faces Ivan Dodig and Grigor Dimitrov (the man compared to Roger Federer) will play 20-year-old German qualifier Cedrik-Marcel Stebe.

Elsewhere, Milos Raonic is in the same group of eight as defending champion Rafael Nadal while other men’s matches to look out for include Lleyton Hewitt vs. Kei Nishikori, Fernando Gonzalez vs. Alexandr Dolgopolov and Dmitry Tursonov vs. Ernests Gulbis.

The women’s draw contains a whole host of 20-year-old qualifiers but regularly-tracked American teenager Sloane Stephens didn’t join them after defeat in the second round of qualifying.

There are so many more young players in the women’s field than the men’s so some selected highlights include Christina McHale vs. Ekaterina Makarova, Melanie Oudin vs. Ana Ivanovic and Simona Halep vs. Bojana Jovanovski.

Ace of Baseline’s main coverage over the two weeks will centre around the juniors which start on 25th June but news from the young up-and-coming players in the main draw will also be featured. The full draws for the men’s singles and women’s singles are available via the official Wimbledon website.

Life after the Sicki

Sabine Lisicki Sabine Lisicki, Germany’s former number one tennis player, looks to be heading back to the heights where she belongs.

Her success at the Aegon Classic is only her second WTA tour title but she should have won so many more by now had it not been for an ankle injury suffered in April 2010.

In 2008, she burst on to the scene as a qualifier reaching the third round of the Australian Open before making the quarter-finals at Wimbledon a year later.

A dramatic drop followed as her ranking points gained at SW19 were not defended and she even fell out of the top 200 this year.

Battling through qualifying events, her form gradually picked up and despite a second round loss to Vera Zvonareva at the French Open last month, where she had a match point at 5-2 in the third and lost it 7-5, a return to the top 100 followed.

Last week she overcame Peng Shuai and former champion at Birmingham Magdalena Rybarikova to set up her first final since the injury.

In fact, her match against Shuai was the first semi-final since the injury and after beating Daniela Hantuchova 6-3, 6-2 in the final today her ranking has increased 38 places to #62.

At 21, she still has every chance of matching her highest position of number 22 in the world and with the amount of older players proving their worth she could easily surpass it.

A top 50 place could be beckoning should she do well at Wimbledon and as an unseeded wildcard many players will fear facing Lisicki on grass.

Her serve, in particular, is back in shape having smashed a total of 43 aces over the whole tournament and eight in the final.

A sigh of relief can now be heard from across Germany as it looks like there are three high-calibre German players on the tour with Julia Goerges and Andrea Petkovic in the top 20 already. Surely one of them can banish the Steffi Graf era.

Grigor Dimitrov

Last week at the Aegon Classic in Birmingham I reluctantly purchased a programme for £5 to pile on top of the expenses of my four-day Parisian venture.

Maria Sharapova and Marion Bartoli were featured inside despite not partaking in the tournament whilst Ana Ivanovic wasn’t despite making the semi-finals. The joys of an ever-changing sporting landscape.

Luckily the advertisement-filled glossy proved a decent buy thanks to a three-page section entitled “The Next Generation”. You can see why it would be of some interest.

In it, there were six players (three from either sex) whom we are told to “keep an eye on”.

I arrogantly told my accompanying friend I’d been tracking Bojana Jovanovski, Heather Watson and Milos Raonic since the early days of this blog and had also covered Alexandr Dolgopolov and Christina McHale in some capacity too. But the one I hadn’t mentioned at all on here was Grigor Dimitrov.

This is how they described the Bulgarian:

Sees himself as a future world no.1 and believes he has no weaknesses. Former coach Peter Lundgren, who helped Roger Federer to his first Grand Slam title, has said that Dimitrov is a better player as a teenager than the Swiss was in his teens.

Without wanting to reach cocky-level again, I did know of Dimitrov before but thought against writing a post or checking his progress at Grand Slams or on tour.

Yet he’s being compared to Roger Federer? A closer inspection, therefore, is a must.

So far Dimitrov has reached a peak of #63 (on his 20th birthday no less) and hasn’t moved much from that position achieved a month ago, dropping just one place.

He’s quite a tall player at 6’2” and possesses the element that draws the Federer comparisons, the one-handed backhand.

His best achievements have been the boys’ singles titles at Wimbledon and the US Open which led to his junior world ranking of number one. Federer didn’t succeed with the middle of these three triumphs but did reach the final at Flushing Meadows losing to David Nalbandian.

And this is where the career paths begin to shift in opposite directions. Dimitrov has yet to win an ATP World Tour title or make a mark on the Grand Slam stage at senior level.

Comparing him to the greatest player of all time is daunting. Looking at his chances compared to his fellow prospects shows he’s still in with a chance of making it, albeit not to Federer’s level.

Also featured next to Dimitrov were Raonic and Dolgopolov. The former just turned 20 when he made it to the fourth round of the Australian Open before going on to win his first ATP World Tour title in San Jose whilst the latter made it to the last eight in Melbourne as a 21-year-old.

Therefore the next few months are going to be critical for Dimitrov. Raonic and Dolgopolov are now established top 50 players and earning seeding positions.

If Dimitrov is to make half as much impact as Federer he’ll have to catch up with the aforementioned duo rapidly. With the grass court season upon us, he may just do that but improving his return of serve is critical having only won 18% of 154 return games played this year.

Certainly, I’ll be looking out for him more in the next 12 months. The Federer backhand is the most wonderful stroke in the sport and to see it executed for another ten years at the top of the game via the hands of Dimitrov would be a delight.

French Open 2011 – Ranking Review

With the second Grand Slam of the year completed the ranking changes this week will feature significant drops and encouraging highs as the points gained or lost are at their highest values.

Therefore it seems an appropriate time to assess how the ATP and WTA tour rankings look heading into the grass court season and how some of the players being tracked on this website are progressing.

The biggest news, and the main brunt of it in all honesty, comes from the WTA tour.

Heather Watson’s five match winning run which saw her through qualifying and into the second round of the main draw has been rewarded with a top 100 place.

It’s the first time the 19-year-old has been in the top 100 and she has a great chance of getting higher this year as she’s entered the Aegon Classic and Wimbledon should give her a wildcard if she can’t qualify automatically.

Another big mover is Caroline Garcia. The 17-year-old almost pulled off the shock of the tournament after being two games away from beating Maria Sharapova in front of her home crowd but her first round win, with some help from her own wildcard, entry means she’s risen 38 places to #150.

Other young players who’ve made big strides are American Christina McHale, Canada’s Rebecca Marino and Romanian Sorana Cirstea.

Sabine Lisicki is back in the top 100 having made the third round and Vania King has reached #85 which is an increase of 30 places.

In terms of the top 10, there is good news for Petra Kvitova who’s at a career high world number eight whilst the chasing pack of Andrea Petkovic, Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and Julia Goerges have nudged ever closer to the next level.

Strangely enough it’s China’s Li Na who’s become a superstar at the age of 29 after becoming the first Asian player to win a Grand Slam title. Not many put that bet on two weeks ago but then again the same could be said of last year’s winner and her opponent in the final Francesca Schiavone.

A similar scenario is emerging in the ATP tour in that the titles are being won by older players. There really isn’t a new generation coming through yet in the men’s game with Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and now Novak Djokovic favourites to win every major, masters series and world championship final.

Two of the above are undoubtedly modern-day legends and until they either retire or become awful then the sport will continue to be dominated by them.

Looking to break the dynasty are the likes of Milos Raonic and Alexandr Dolgopolov, who have dropped a place and gained one respectively. They seem to be the only young players with top 10 potential at the present time.

Marin Cilic and Ernests Gulbis had that at one point but the former has gone down six places over the two weeks and 13 places in total from the start of the year. Gulbis, incidentally, has actually gone up five places.

There are other ways of becoming a tennis superstar though. Just making the top 50 these days gets you noticed whilst you can still be big in your home country or continent, which Li Na has proven and Kei Nishikori is still striving for.

The Japanese 22-year-old is down a place but is still up 38 from the start of January. The American situation is also intriguing with their supposed lack of depth but Mardy Fish and Andy Roddick have both returned to the top 10 but youngster Ryan Harrison has moved down three places to #122.

The men’s tour is interesting. It seems to be in different leagues right now. But still, the young players, and even some old where warranted, will continue to be charted here whether that be in the top 10, top 100 or number one in Kazakhstan.

French Open Juniors 2011 – Boys’ Singles Final

America has hope. This is nothing to do with Barack Obama but the feeling of hope around their part-Italian, Swedish-named 17-year-old prospect has risen thanks to his win in the French Open boys’ singles final.

Bjorn Fratangelo

Bjorn Fratangelo, named after six-time Roland Garros champion Bjorn Borg, defeated Dominic Thiem of Austria in a hard-fought contest that went down to the wire eventually taking it 3-6, 6-3, 8-6.

He’s now being talked about in the same sentence as John McEnroe having become the first American to win the boys’ title at Roland Garros since the outlandish legend succeeded in 1977.

The match itself consisted of huge hitting and a great start for Thiem, who took the first set with only one break required.

Fratangelo bounced back with a reverse of the first set scoreline before going toe-to-toe with Thiem in the third. Despite being involved in lengthy games on the Austrian’s serve, Fratangelo couldn’t take his chances and eight aces bailed Thiem out.

The breakthrough eventually came with good timing. At 6-6, the American broke and held to love sealing a great match and tournament victory.

Fratangelo, who turns 18 next month, emerged from virtually nowhere to take the crown. Before the tournament he’d never won a Grand Slam match in his career and entered unseeded.

He overcame 11th seed Joris De Loore in the third round before knocking out Oliver Golding in the quarter-finals to continue his success against the world number four having beaten the Brit in the Trofeo Bonfiglio last month.

It’s given him an increase of 19 positions in the junior rankings to #2 and he now says he’ll be participating in Futures events to increase his ATP World Tour ranking which is well below the top 1000.

For the 14th seeded Thiem, he has been re-instated in the top 10 junior rankings while the 17-year-old sits in the top 1000 of the men’s tour.

And in another tight scrap Spanish duo Andres Artunedo Martinavarr and Roberto Carballes Baena won the boys’ doubles title on a tiebreak which they took 10-5.

French Open Juniors 2011 – Girls’ Singles Final

It was a weekend of historic victories in female tennis with Li Na becoming the first Asian Grand Slam winner and Tunisia’s Ons Jabeur overcoming Monica Puig 7-6 (10-8), 6-1 in the French Open girls’ singles final.

Ons Jabeur (TUN)

The 16-year-old is the first girl from North Africa to win a junior Grand Slam title and has also matched the feat of fellow Tunisian Mustapha Belkhodja who was the boys’ champion back in 1956.

She came close to winning 12 months ago having made the final in 2010 but beat this year’s Australian Open finalist Puig to deny the Puerto Rican a maiden Grand Slam title.

Despite losing in straight sets it could have been very different for the fifth seed as a tiebreak first set turned out to be the pivotal moment of the match.

Both players had chances to claim the set in the 18-game tiebreak. Puig saved set points when 4-6 and 6-7 down and then had two set points herself which Jabeur turned around thanks to a couple of timely aces and a forehand winner.

The ninth seed then came into her element and produced an array of shots in a fine advertisement for specialist clay court tennis.

The drop shot had the most prevalent use and allowed her to cruise to victory, breaking Puig three times and not giving her a sniff of a break back.

Although disappointed now, 17-year-old Puig is enjoying a successful year having won two $25,000 ITF titles which have seen her WTA ranking rise to #314.

Jabeur’s junior ranking has risen to number four after this triumph and with a good record in grass and hard courts she’ll be aiming to increase her WTA position which is currently outside the top 500.

Jabeur joins previous girls’ singles winners such as Martina Hingis and Justine Henin whilst the girls’ doubles winners were Irina Khromacheva and Maryna Zanevska to join the likes Kim Clijsters, Victoria Azarenka and Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova who have enjoyed wins in that category in the past.

French Open Juniors 2011 – Semi-finals

The final line-ups for the 2011 French Open juniors have been decided with the two favourites that looked destined to meet in the girls’ singles final both losing in three set semi-final encounters.

Irina Khromacheva (RUS)

Russian second seed Irina Khromacheva had an unbeaten record stretching back to March but couldn’t keep the run going on the Grand Slam stage as Monica Puig won 6-3, 1-6, 7-5.

The Puerto Rican has been in impressive form herself on the ITF circuit and the opening set reflected the players’ current confidence as the pair broke each other several times. Puig came out on top before Khromacheva blitzed the second set despite a first serve percentage of 40%.

The decider lasted more than an hour and the Russian’s continued poor service game allowed Puig two break conversions to seal victory.

Her opponent in the final is not the one the French crowd had hoped for. Their rising homegrown star Caroline Garcia had been a set and 4-1 up against Maria Sharapova last week but she’s struggled in the junior event.

The 17-year-old came back after losing the first set to Ons Jabeur of Tunisia but 12 double faults in the match and her failure to hold serve once in the third set led to her elimination at the semi-final stage with the final score reading 6-2, 1-6, 6-2.

Both Puig and Jabeur have experience at junior Grand Slam finals. Fifth seed Puig lost the Australian Open final in January to junior world number one An-Sophie Mestach whilst ninth seed Jabeur reached the final at Roland Garros last year before losing to Elina Svitolina.

The two boys’ semi-finals also went to three sets but the bad news continued for French tennis as Tristan Lamasine bowed out.

Wildcard Lamasine had surpassed everyone’s expectations by making the last four in his home tournament having failed to make it past the first round last year.

It was a similar situation for his opponent too. American Bjorn Fratangelo had previously never won a Grand Slam match but recent good form on clay means he’s in with a chance of becoming the first US winner of the boys’ singles title at Roland Garros since John McEnroe in 1977.

Fratangelo was clinical with his break point opportunities taking three out of three to win 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 leaving Lamasine wondering what might have been had he taken his other seven break point chances.

Word is going round that Bjorn Borg is set to be in attendance for the boys’ singles match on Sunday (also the day of the girls’ singles final). Perhaps a good omen for the boy named after the Roland Garros legend.

If he’s to take the crown then he’ll have to stop 14th seed Dominic Thiem after the Austrian came back from losing the first set to beat Mate Delic 3-6, 6-3, 6-1.

There was good news for Irina Khromacheva in the girls’ doubles as herself and her partner Maryna Zanevska reached the final. They’ll play Victoria Kan and Demi Schuurs whilst American pairing Mitchell Krueger and Shane Vinsant face Spanish duo Andres Artunedo Martinavarr and Roberto Carballes Baena in the boys’ doubles final.

French Open Juniors 2011 – Quarter-finals

Bjorn Fratangelo British fourth seed Oliver Golding crashed out of the French Open juniors after being beaten by Amercan Bjorn Fratangelo for the second time in two weeks.

In the clay of Milan during the Trofeo Bonfiglio, Golding had been smashed 6-2, 6-0 and in Paris the outcome was to the same degree going down 6-1, 6-1 in just 47 minutes.

Back then Golding vented his frustration on Twitter and this time was no different. The 18-year-old said: “I have to put my hands up and say ‘too good’. When I played him two weeks ago it was the best anyone has ever played against me, but I think he just played even better.”

Not only did Golding lose in singles but he’s out of Roland Garros completely after his run in the doubles also came to an end when himself and Jiri Vesely were beaten in their quarter-final match.

There was some good news for Golding later though when it was announced he had been given a wildcard for the grass court tournament in Queen’s next week. Another young American, Ryan Harrison, was also one of the four wildcards.

For Fratangelo, named after clay-court specialist Bjorn Borg, it’s been a fruitful couple of weeks on the red dirt having reached the quarter-finals of the Trofeo Bonfiglio and now his first Grand Slam semi-final.

The 17-year-old has a great chance of making the final too but seeing off home talent Tristan Lamasine could be a tough task. Lamasine beat German Robert Kern in straights but it was less than straightforward with the wildcard saving three set points in a second set tiebreak before winning it 8-6.

In the other half of the draw, Dominic Thiem became the only surviving seed in the boys’ singles. The 14th seed beat Spain’s Oriol Roca Batalla 6-3, 6-2 and will play Mate Delic who beat another wildcard quarter-finalist in the form of Miki Jankovic.

After five days which saw the the top five seeds progressing in the girls’ singles a shock was finally provided. Top seed Daria Gavrilova played came out worse in a three set encounter with Tunisian Ons Jabeur.

Jabeur now has the chance of making history as the first Tunisian to win a Grand Slam title. She came close last year, finishing as runner-up and will now have the tricky task of beating Caroline Garcia if she’s going to at least match that.

The number three seed came through her match with Yulia Putintseva comfortably and made a change from her tight struggles having almost gone out of the tournament in round two after being match point down.

Putintseva and Gavrilova had been two of three Russians in the last eight but only one made it to the semi-finals and she looks unstoppable.

Irina Khromacheva, Trofeo Bonfiglio winner two weeks ago and unbeaten since mid-March has yet to drop a set in the French Open juniors this year and dispatched of Anett Kontaveit 6-4, 6-1.

At #520 on the WTA rankings the recently turned 16-year-old is already looking like a future star and next to face that imperialistic form is Monica Puig.

The fifth seeded Puerto Rican’s potential classic with fourth seed Natalija Kostic didn’t pan out that way and she came though in comprehensive fashion finishing with a 6-1, 6-3 scoreline.

At #314 in the world rankings of the WTA tour, the semi-final between Puig and Khromacheva could be the showcase of women’s tennis’ next generation.

All the boys’ doubles and girls’ doubles news is also available via the Roland Garros website.

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